mightyflynn:

Look at the wall,” David Mellor, the Boston Red Sox groundskeeper, said to sports photographer CJ Gunther. “Ok,” shrugged back Gunther. “No. Really look at it.” It was then that Gunther realized he was staring at hundreds of baseball marks scattered along Fenway’s famous Green Monster wall. “You need to come shoot pictures of these,” said Mellor.” And with Mellor’s declaration in 2009, CJ Gunther began his body of work, chronicling the detailed scars scattered across baseball’s arguably most famous wall. “My first reaction was awe. I’ve been coming here forever and never seen this,” recalls Gunther.

- Sarah Polger (National Geographic)

Read and see more: "Marks on the Green Monster: CJ Gunther’s Baseball Graffiti" 

via bobbycaputo

(via kimmiejeannn)

brockstarholt:

wordsinbetween:

Well crap. I hope Utah is safe. But if I’m blacked out by NL teams like the Rockies and maybe some in California? Then oh well. This is not good news! Why would you tell me this! I thought I’d be safe!

Here’s the map. Looks like the Diamondbacks and Rockies are blacked out. Maybe? Kinda hard to tell which color is which there. I think you’re safe! 

I  love mlb.tv! I get the premium and it is the best $20 per month I spend on anything, hands down. It helps that I don’t live anywhere near any of my teams though. Still, I watch or listen to (on my phone, PC at work, on my tablet, or at home) 3-7 games per week. No shortage of baseball, for sure. The streaming can be wonky, but I got a new router and that’s fixed my troubles so far. It may be different for you, but I am a big fan, like I could probably write ads for mlb.tv, hahaha

brockstarholt:

wordsinbetween:

Well crap. I hope Utah is safe. But if I’m blacked out by NL teams like the Rockies and maybe some in California? Then oh well.
This is not good news! Why would you tell me this! I thought I’d be safe!

Here’s the map. Looks like the Diamondbacks and Rockies are blacked out. Maybe? Kinda hard to tell which color is which there. I think you’re safe! 

I love mlb.tv! I get the premium and it is the best $20 per month I spend on anything, hands down. It helps that I don’t live anywhere near any of my teams though. Still, I watch or listen to (on my phone, PC at work, on my tablet, or at home) 3-7 games per week. No shortage of baseball, for sure. The streaming can be wonky, but I got a new router and that’s fixed my troubles so far. It may be different for you, but I am a big fan, like I could probably write ads for mlb.tv, hahaha

Just sort of sicky and whiny over here. Stupid ear infection. What am I, four years old?

a-loss-forever-new:

May I introduce you… Monteverde Angel or Angel of the Resurrection. It is the name given to a beautiful marble statue of 1882 that guards the tomb of the Oneto family in the cemetery of Staglieno in Genoa (Italy). It is one of the most famous works of sculptor Giulio Monteverde.

(via dansemacabre-)

flora-file:

How to keep your venus fly trap happy (and alive) - by flora-file

After my post about cutting the flower buds off when a venus fly trap flowers, I got some questions about how to care for this plant, and specifically people asked how I could possibly keep one alive for ten years. Just follow these handy dandy tips to keep your venus fly trap chomping small invertebrates for years to come.

  1. Sunlight - Unfortunately this plant is not a houseplant. It needs direct sun to survive, hopefully about 8 hours a day. Mine lives on my patio and gets a few hours of direct light in the morning, and then bright indirect light (which is different than shade) for the rest of the day, and it seems to do fine. Plants that don’t get enough light tend to have elongated leaves, stretched out by the plants hopeless attempt to grow toward some source of light. Happy plants have short leaves and lots of traps. They still need light to photosynthesize no matter how many flies or spiders you feed them.
  2. Distilled or Purified Water - These plants are very sensitive to minerals dissolved in water, especially the fluoride and chloride found in most tap water. Not even spring water is okay, as it contains trace minerals that may be detrimental to the health of the plant. Rainwater will probably work, as long as you don’t live next to a coal burning power plant or some other source of gross air pollution. This may be the most common form of venus fly trap neglect, as people that have killed their fly trap have usually not followed this important rule.
  3. Peat Moss or Coco Coir substrate - The venus fly trap is a bog plant that naturally grows in mucky, nitrogen deprived soil. The whole bug eating behavior arose from the need for additional nitrogen that was severely lacking in the soil. Both peat moss and coco coir have extremely low nitrogen content, making them suitable for the needs of this plant. I used coco coir when I repotted mine a couple years ago, and it worked great. Coco coir is much cheaper than peat moss, and also a better choice environmentally.
  4. A steady diet of…nothing! - Don’t give it fertilizers or chemicals, no Dr Shultz or Miracle Grow. And don’t feed it hamburger either, that’s just wrong. If it is healthy it will catch bugs all by itself, almost like its evolved to catch bugs or something. Keep the substrate constantly moist. I keep mine in a container that doesn’t drain and keep it in standing water constantly. Whatever happens, don’t let it dry out.

If you follow these simple steps your fly trap should grow old of the bulb and long in the tooth. I’m not saying this is the only way to take care of your fly trap, but its how I take care of mine. And after 10 years its still working. Good luck, and garden on!

(via brilliantbotany)

books0977:

Légende Dorée (1897). Armand Point (French, 1861–1932). Lithograph.
In 1897, Point contributed an original lithograph titled the Golden Legend (Fr. Légende dorée) to the L’Estampe Moderne. The journal included four original prints in each issue and Point’s was issued in Number 5, September 1897. 

books0977:

Légende Dorée (1897). Armand Point (French, 1861–1932). Lithograph.

In 1897, Point contributed an original lithograph titled the Golden Legend (Fr. Légende dorée) to the L’Estampe Moderne. The journal included four original prints in each issue and Point’s was issued in Number 5, September 1897. 

(via antiquelullaby)